Return to this section's archives
 
ARTS & BOOKS January 2006
On Athletic Art Robbers, the Independent Film Mecca and its Acclaimed Prophet at Sundance, the Voyage Intérieur exhibition in Paris.
by Pauline LAVAGNE d'ORTIGUE


Athletic Art Robbers
A two-tonne solid bronze sculpture entitled Reclining Figure (1969) by Henry Moore was stolen from open land belonging to the Henry Moore Foundation in Hertfordshire.
The 11ft piece is worth £3 million but is likely to have been lifted for its raw metal value which is estimated at £5,000. As Henry Moore stipulated that his original moulds should never be used to cast more of his bronzes, the Reclining Figure could be lost for ever if it makes it to the scrap-yard.

Source : « Oi ! Who Lifted that Two-Tonne Henry Moore, » The Observer 18 December 2005.



Independent Film Mecca & Acclaimed Prophet
On December 4th, Robert Redford received the Kennedy Center Honors for his « extraordinary support of independent film .» Twenty five years ago, he founded The Sundance Institute to foster the discovery and development of independent film and theatre artists. At the time the advent of home video and cable helped fuel the success of such blockbusters as Jaws and Star Wars, and Redford felt that humanistic cinema was under threat.
The 2006 Sundance Film Festival, which will take place between January 19 and 29 in Park City, Utah, has become over the years THE prime showcase for the work of American independent and international filmmakers that embody creative risk-taking, diversity, and aesthetic innovation. This year, Sundance programmers combed through 1,004 American and 936 international feature films, 760 American and 448 international documentaries and 4,311 shorts.

Sources : « The Soul of Sundance's Machine, » The New York Times 4 December 2005 ; « The Sundance King: Nurturer Is Redford's Acclaimed Role, » The Washington Post 4 December 2005.

A Passage to London / A Passage to Paris

The kaleidoscopic work of 23 British and French contemporary artists exhibited at the Espace Electra (Paris) explores the extent to which the Paris and London art scenes have influenced one another. A dramatic scenography highlights the labyrinthine and peripatetic nature of these imaginary connections.
http://www.britishcouncil.fr/


About us Privacy policy© Copyright